GoPro Hero 7

GoPro Hero 7 Black,Hyper mobile, Hyper Smooth

In the following couple of years, GoPro has been working to get back to its core, and try to make money. GoPro Hero 7 started 2018 on the floor of that proverbial half-pipe, bruised and bloody. The company’s stock had flatlined. Just nine months later, though, there’s a renewed current of optimism running through GoPro’s leadership. Yes, you thought right. The GoPro Hero 7 Black. The camera range is streamlined (there’s no more session), and from now there’s no more Hero, Hero 5 or Hero 6. Instead, we have three Hero 7’s, with different prices and varying feature sets. With more than 30 compatible accessories, unique perspectives open up for you, you can record your life in a creative new way. The Hero 7 Black takes the power of the GoPro and your photos and videos to a whole new level.

From the outside, the newest GoPro Hero 7 black – along with its Silver and White counterparts – may look virtually identical to its predecessor, but that’s no bad thing. From an aesthetic standpoint it’s not the drastic change some people crave, but from a practical standpoint it’s great.

People who buy new GoPro cameras generally have had them before, and many invest in additional accessories, casings and mounts. An entirely new shape would mean reinvesting to either make the camera fit existing equipment or replacing old accessories with all-new ones.

Still, put the Hero 6 and Hero 7 Black side-by-side and there’s still enough difference to tell them apart. Rather than be a matte dark grey, the Hero 7 Black is (as its name suggests) actually black. Similarly, the Hero 7 White and Hero 7 Silver (replacing the Hero 5 and 2018 Hero) are coloured to match their names.

Most of the exterior is covered in a soft-touch textured finish, giving it some form of grippy-ness. Although saying that, the sides and bottom edges don’t have the grippy, textured rubbery feel of its predecessor. In our testing so far, it hasn’t made it difficult to keep hold of, so it’s not exactly missed.

Buttons, ports and features are all positioned in the same places as before. That means you get the square-ish protruding lens housing on the front, alongside a small monochrome display, while the back features the colour touchscreen. Looking it from the back, the left side features the small door flap covering the mini HDMI and USB Type-C ports, and the underside is where you’ll find the battery door which – as well as giving access to the removable battery – also covers the microSD card slot.

Apart from that, there’s the standard physical button layout for controls. The record button with its red circle icon sits on top of the camera, while the power/mode button is on the right (looking from the back).

It’s the same, small, durable and lightweight build as before so it’s no issue to carry around in your hand or pocket, and thanks to being waterproof, you can also take it to record any water based activities. That’s presuming you don’t take it passed its 10 meter depth limit.

As well as having all the high end photo and video capture capabilities, you’d expect from a top-of-the-line GoPro, there are a couple of additional shooting features you need to know about here. Both enabled by some clever stabilisation added by the internal GP1 processor, now with added DRAM (Dynamic Random-Access Memory). First up, and perhaps the most visually stunning is TimeWarp. It’s essentially a time-lapse video, but unlike you’ve seen before from a GoPro. Because it’s stabilised using an algorithm, the footage is unbelievably smooth. The same stabilisation is present in regular video mode as well, even when shooting at the highest 4K resolution at 60 frames-per-second. Running and holding it in our hand with no physical stabilisation, it did a great job of evening out the usual shakiness you’d expect to see,

Having a touchscreen on a GoPro isn’t a new thing, but the revamped interface changes the way you interact with it, for the better. While similar gestures are required to launch different features and settings, the new onscreen buttons are easier to understand and easier to use. You swipe left or right across the screen to switch between time-lapse, video and photo modes, or swipe down from the top to get to in-depth settings and preferences.

You also get a couple of onscreen buttons to quickly change the shooting modes, by choosing your resolution, frame rate or – when shooting stills – opting for Night mode or Burst mode. It’s really intuitive and, while using a small touchscreen can be fiddly, it’s not at all difficult to learn how to use it.

One interesting feature is its ability to detect smiles and faces, not necessarily to activate shooting as soon as it sees one, but rather to be able to analyse the best frames in a video to choose when the GoPro app automatically cuts together a QuickStory for you in the background.

For the Instagram fans, one new feature you’ll either love, or ignore, is the ability to shoot vertical videos and photos. Turn the camera on its side and the interface on screen rotates 90-degrees and it shoots vertical. Also, GoPro is enabling live streaming through its GoPro app to Facebook Live. The Facebook users, the Instagram generation, the suckers for trips all practically benefit.

It’s a 12-megapixel Digital camera, but has been enhanced with a feature called SuperPhoto. What this essentially does is automatically boosts contrast and colour when it’s needed, and in localised zones. For low light shots, it rids the photo of noise, making dark blue skies seem smooth and grain-free. Or, at least, that’s the claim.

Do not miss anything. With the Supercharger (sold separately), you recharge the camera quickly so as not to miss an adventure.

In the following couple of years, GoPro has been working to get back to its core, and try to make money. GoPro started 2018 on the floor of that proverbial half-pipe, bruised and bloody. The company’s stock had flatlined. Just nine months later, though, there’s a renewed current of optimism running through GoPro’s leadership. Yes, you thought right. The GoPro Hero 7 Black. The camera range is streamlined (there’s no more session), and from now there’s no more Hero, Hero 5 or Hero 6. Instead, we have three Hero 7’s, with different prices and varying feature sets. With more than 30 compatible accessories, unique perspectives open up for you, you can record your life in a creative new way. The Hero 7 Black takes the power of the GoPro and your photos and videos to a whole new level.

From the outside, the newest GoPro Hero 7 black – along with its Silver and White counterparts – may look virtually identical to its predecessor, but that’s no bad thing. From an aesthetic standpoint it’s not the drastic change some people crave, but from a practical standpoint it’s great.

People who buy new GoPro cameras generally have had them before, and many invest in additional accessories, casings and mounts. An entirely new shape would mean reinvesting to either make the camera fit existing equipment or replacing old accessories with all-new ones.

Still, put the Hero 6 and Hero 7 Black side-by-side and there’s still enough difference to tell them apart. Rather than be a matte dark grey, the Hero 7 Black is (as its name suggests) actually black. Similarly, the Hero 7 White and Hero 7 Silver (replacing the Hero 5 and 2018 Hero) are coloured to match their names.

Most of the exterior is covered in a soft-touch textured finish, giving it some form of grippy-ness. Although saying that, the sides and bottom edges don’t have the grippy, textured rubbery feel of its predecessor. In our testing so far, it hasn’t made it difficult to keep hold of, so it’s not exactly missed.

Buttons, ports and features are all positioned in the same places as before. That means you get the square-ish protruding lens housing on the front, alongside a small monochrome display, while the back features the colour touchscreen. Looking it from the back, the left side features the small door flap covering the mini HDMI and USB Type-C ports, and the underside is where you’ll find the battery door which – as well as giving access to the removable battery – also covers the microSD card slot.

Apart from that, there’s the standard physical button layout for controls. The record button with its red circle icon sits on top of the camera, while the power/mode button is on the right (looking from the back).

It’s the same, small, durable and lightweight build as before so it’s no issue to carry around in your hand or pocket, and thanks to being waterproof, you can also take it to record any water based activities. That’s presuming you don’t take it passed its 10 meter depth limit.

As well as having all the high end photo and video capture capabilities, you’d expect from a top-of-the-line GoPro, there are a couple of additional shooting features you need to know about here. Both enabled by some clever stabilisation added by the internal GP1 processor, now with added DRAM (Dynamic Random-Access Memory). First up, and perhaps the most visually stunning is TimeWarp. It’s essentially a time-lapse video, but unlike you’ve seen before from a GoPro. Because it’s stabilised using an algorithm, the footage is unbelievably smooth. The same stabilisation is present in regular video mode as well, even when shooting at the highest 4K resolution at 60 frames-per-second. Running and holding it in our hand with no physical stabilisation, it did a great job of evening out the usual shakiness you’d expect to see,

Having a touchscreen on a GoPro isn’t a new thing, but the revamped interface changes the way you interact with it, for the better. While similar gestures are required to launch different features and settings, the new onscreen buttons are easier to understand and easier to use. You swipe left or right across the screen to switch between time-lapse, video and photo modes, or swipe down from the top to get to in-depth settings and preferences.

You also get a couple of onscreen buttons to quickly change the shooting modes, by choosing your resolution, frame rate or – when shooting stills – opting for Night mode or Burst mode. It’s really intuitive and, while using a small touchscreen can be fiddly, it’s not at all difficult to learn how to use it.

One interesting feature is its ability to detect smiles and faces, not necessarily to activate shooting as soon as it sees one, but rather to be able to analyse the best frames in a video to choose when the GoPro app automatically cuts together a QuickStory for you in the background.

For the Instagram fans, one new feature you’ll either love, or ignore, is the ability to shoot vertical videos and photos. Turn the camera on its side and the interface on screen rotates 90-degrees and it shoots vertical. Also, GoPro is enabling live streaming through its GoPro app to Facebook Live. The Facebook users, the Instagram generation, the suckers for trips all practically benefit.

It’s a 12-megapixel camera, but has been enhanced with a feature called SuperPhoto. What this essentially does is automatically boosts contrast and colour when it’s needed, and in localised zones. For low light shots, it rids the photo of noise, making dark blue skies seem smooth and grain-free. Or, at least, that’s the claim.

Do not miss anything. With the Supercharger (sold separately), you recharge the camera quickly so as not to miss an adventure.

With all that said, we’re still in awe of the stabilisation features, particularly in the TimeWarp mode, it makes such a huge difference. So if you’re in the market for a new GoPro and want the most impressive to date, the new Hero 7 Black seems a no-brainer.

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